Posted in 2019

Testing Pandoc and Jupyter Notebooks

For several months now, the universal document converter pandoc has had support for Jupyter Notebooks. This means that with a single call, you can convert .ipynb files to any of the output formats that Pandoc supports (and vice-versa!). This post is a quick exploration of what this looks like.

Note that for this post, we’re using Pandoc version 2.7.3. Also, some of what’s below is hard to interpret without actually opening the files that are created by Pandoc. For the sake of this blog post, I’m going to stick with the raw text output here, though you can expand the outputs if you wish, I recommend copy/pasting some of these commands on your own if you’d like to try.

Read more ...


What would Python-style governance look like in Jupyter?

This is the second in a series of blog posts that explores what it’d look like to directly port the governance model of other communities into the Jupyter project. You can find the first post about Rust here.

Note: These posts are meant as a thought experiment rather than a proposal. Moreover, all the usual caveats come with it, such as the fact that I don’t know the Python governance structure that well, and I might totally botch my characterization of it.

Read more ...


Analyzing intracranial electrophysiology data with xarray

Over the last few years, it has been exciting to see the xarray project evolve, add new functionality, and mature. This post is an attempt at giving xarray another visit to see how it could integrate into electrophysiology workflows.

It is common in neuroscience to ask individuals to perform a task over and over again. You record the activity in the brain each time they perform the task (called an “epoch” or a “trial”). Time is recorded relative to some onset when the task begins. That is t==0. The result is usually a matrix of epochs x channejupyls x time. You can do a lot of stuff with this data, but our task in this paper is to detect changes in neural activity at trial onset (t==0).

Read more ...


What would Rust-style governance look like in Jupyter?

As I’ve written about before, I like Rust’s governance structure. I mean, who can’t get behind a community that lists governance as a top-level page on its website?

Jupyter is currently in the middle of figuring out the next phase of its governance structure, and so I have been thinking about what this might look like. This post is a quick thought-experiment to explore what it’d mean to port over Rust’s governance directly into the Jupyter community.

Read more ...


Automating Jupyter Book deployments with CI/CD

Lately I’ve spent a lot of time trying to reduce the friction involved in deploying Jupyter Book as well as contributing to the project. Features are a great carrot, but ultimately getting engagement is also about lowering barriers to entry and showing people a path forward. Jupyter Book is a relatively straightforward project, but it involves a few technical pieces that can be painful to use (thanks Jekyll).

Recently I experimented with whether we can automate deploying a Jupyter Book online. Using continuous integration / deployment services seems like a natural place to try this out. One can upload a barebones set of code to a GitHub repository, then configure a build system to create a book and deploy it online from there. This blog post is a place to keep track of the current state of affairs for this workflow.

auto build logos

Read more ...


A few recent talks

Lately I’ve given quite a number of talks about the Jupyter and Binder ecosystems for various purposes. Before each of the talks, I make the slides available at a public address in case others are interested in following up with the material. For those who missed the talks (or the subsequent tweets about them), here are a few of the more recent ones.

A word of warning: there’s a lot of overlap between these talks - I’m not crazy enough to re-invent the wheel each time I have to speak. However, maybe folks will find some value in the different angles taken in each case.

Read more ...


Thoughts from the Jupyter team meeting 2019

I just got back from a week-long Jupyter team meeting that was somehow both very tiring and energizing at the same time. In the spirit of openness, I’d like to share some of my experience. While it’s still fresh in my mind, here are a few takeaways that occurred to me throughout the week.

Note that these are my personal (rough) impressions, but they shouldn’t be taken as a statement from the project/community itself.

Read more ...


Three things I love about CircleCI

I recently had to beef up the continuous deployment of Jupyter Book, and used it as an opportunity to learn a bit more about CircleCI’s features. It turns out, they’re pretty cool! Here are a few of the things that I learned this time around.

For those who aren’t familiar with CircleCI, it is a service that runs Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) workflows for projects. This basically means that they manage many kinds of infrastructure that can launch jobs that run test suites, deploy applications, and test on many different environments.

Read more ...